A description of the inuit community their culture and tradition and how government tries to innovat

A description of the inuit community their culture and tradition and how government tries to innovat

Where possible, chapters from the initial review were re-formatted for consistency with the organization of chapters in the second historical review.

The presence of more government administrators in the Arctic, sometimes Inuit, enlarged social welfare and community development programming, particularly in the areas of education and healthcare.

Inuit colonization

In , however, responsibility for the health of First Nations and Inuit were given to the Department of National Health and Welfare, and according to R. Inuit did not wander aimlessly in search of meat and fish. At this time, Quebec was the only region inhabited by Inuit with a provincial government. The federal government issued relief to Inuit, as it did for First Nations throughout Canada, even though Inuit status and federal responsibility for the administration of their affairs was not clearly defined. Although Public History conducted two oral history interviews, Inuit perspectives on the research issues were not presented in depth. The objective was to remedy the, "almost continuing state of absence of mind" in which Inuit had previously been administered. In between they would harvest berries, birds eggs, fish for lake trout or cod and use whatever food nature provided. The ubiquitous 18' open boat with a 50hp outboard motor is a common sight in many Nunavut communities, althought for months of the year the boat is unusable due to winter conditions. Acculturation of Inuit to southern Canadian wage labour culture was intended to improve standards of living toward the Canadian Government's goal of Inuit participation at a middle class level in the socioeconomic system, "thereby reliev[ing] the nation of a major welfare burden. During this phase of the project, Public History combined into one document the two historical reviews completed in December and November

For months of the year there is sufficient snow on the land and ice on the frozen ocean and lakes to make snowmobile travel practicable. Different Inuit groups used different types of kayak and umiak depending on the materials available and the prey being hunted.

Their lifestyle was semi-nomadic moving three or four times a year. During this phase of the project, Public History combined into one document the two historical reviews completed in December and November Each section of the reports included endnotes, and a complete bibliography of sources consulted was available at the conclusion of each report.

inuit lifestyle

By the s, the government began to settle the Inuit in permanent communities, and the pressure to adapt to Western ways increased.

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Canada's Relationship with Inuit: A History of Policy and Program Development